Where Do Spin Accidents Occur?

Slow flight and stall training helps you prevent a stall – the predecessor to a spin. Spin training teaches you to recover from a spin. But to recover from a real-life, unintentional spin, you’ll need both the time (altitude) and skill to recover.

Analysis of NTSB accident investigations from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2015 found 53 accidents in that data set, and then broken down by phase of flight.

By far, most of the spin accidents occurred at low altitude, below or near 1,000′ AGL – during takeoff, landing, go-around or maneuvering. Only a few spins, 17%, clearly started above 1,000′ AGL.

Determining the entry altitude for each accident was difficult and the NTSB wasn’t able to reliably determine entry altitude for many of the accidents. But, by considering the phase of flight, you can get a rough idea of altitude. You’ll find the NTSB identifiers in parentheses.

3rd Annual Fort Lauderdale Air Show

Fort Lauderdale Air Show
May 5-6, 2018

U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds will return to South Florida to headline the Fort Lauderdale Air Show presented by the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention and Visitors Bureau when it soars over Fort Lauderdale Beach for the third straight year on May 5-6, 2018!

 

SOCOM Para-Commanders

The United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Parachute Team, called the Para-Commandos, will also be participating in the Air Show.  They are composed of volunteers from the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and U.S. government civilians who are assigned to Special Operations Command.

WHY DO YOU WANT TO FLY?

Flight training will enrich your life in countless ways. You’ll learn to balance technical training with the freedom of flying toward an endless horizon. You’ll adopt new ways of speaking, navigating, and calculating your position. What initially feels like a complex process will slowly become second nature, and you will always have a great story to tell.

Knowing your goal for learning to fly will help guide you along the path to the right certificate and all the rewards that flying has to offer.

 

WHAT ARE MY OPTIONS?

 

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO?
Day flights in light-sport aircraft
Fly personal or business, travel in clear weather
Fly personal or business, travel in clear or cloudy weather
Fly higher and faster in airplanes with two engines
Get paid to fly
Teach people to fly
Be an airline captain

 

To see full article visit: Learn to Fly – AOPA

Introductory & Discover Flights

Spread your wings and fly above Miami

Get an all encompassing view from the sky — the coastline, the downtown skyline, the port of Miami, and the Everglades.

One hour flight for $150 includes all fees and you are at the controls in the pilot seat. Even better, the fee allows you to bring someone along to sit in the back seat to take photos and videos. That’s less expensive than dinner at a nice restaurant.

This is an ideal family event for parents and their teenager to share or a father/son or mother/daughter adventure. True romantics can never go wrong in showing their love and creativity by taking their loved one for a ride “above” Miami, thousands of feet in the air.

Your experienced instructor can share colorful fables of this Florida coastline or quiet time to have your personal discussions. You choose!

Crosswind Fears

By: Bob Martens

Subscriber question:
“I avoid flying when crosswinds are present, even if they aren’t that strong. How can I get over this fear?” – Harold P.

Bob:
“Far too many pilots share in this fear of crosswinds, the root of which goes back to our initial training. Far too often, crosswinds are a contributing factor in small airplane accidents.

The design of aircraft obviously makes them vulnerable to crosswinds. But a good instructor will train their students that the pilot has everything they need to deal with crosswinds available in the flight controls.

On downwind we crab as necessary to maintain a track parallel to the landing runway. On final, there is much discussion as to whether the pilot should crab again into the wind until just before touchdown or fly a wing low approach while maintaining alignment with rudder. Either technique works, but the timing on removing the crab prior to touchdown is critical to a safe landing.

A simple technique to gain confidence with crosswinds is to fly a low approach over the runway, using your flight controls to maintain alignment. It won’t take long to realize that rather than living in fear of crosswinds, we merely have to realize how they are impacting our aircraft and respond accordingly. Obviously, winds can be gusty and variable so constant vigilance is required to proactively maintain positive aircraft control.

Remember, all manufacturers publish a (recommended) crosswind limit that must be respected by the pilot. And depending upon your personal experience and training you may very well have a limit more cautious than the manufacturer, but all pilots should understand and be comfortable flying their aircraft during crosswind conditions.”

 

To see complete article: https://www.pilotworkshop.com/tips/crosswind-fears

Multi-Engine Training

For multi-engine training, you will need a private pilot license (single-engine) and a minimum of ten hours of training in a multi-engine aircraft. At the end of the training is an oral and practical test.
Miami Fly Twin Engine Plane

Prerequisite:

A Private Pilot License is recommended for multi-engine training, but we suggest that you get your instrument and commercial rating before you start your training. The expense will be less if you meet all the commercial requirements in the single engine and then add-on a multi-engine commercial. It is all up to you. You must be able to read, understand and speak English like the other ratings.

Time Frame:

The multi-engine rating takes 7-14 days if you have already received your instrument rating. If you do not have the instrument rating, it will limit your ability to rent multi-engine airplanes at our school and many others.

Curriculum:

A standard check ride is required with a designated examiner like all other ratings. The topics to be discussed will be: single engine out procedures, weight and balance, aircraft systems, and emergency procedures. If you are working towards the commercial multi-engine rating with instrument privileges, two precision approaches will be required for the check ride. A written exam is not required for the multi-engine rating.

Cost:

The cost of a commercial, instrument, multi-engine add-on is approximately $280 an hour depending on learning curve. Please CLICK HERE for a price chart.

Give DAD the Gift of Flying an Airplane!

This Father’s Day surprise dad with a unique gift idea — a gift certificate for flight lessons!

Whether it’s an aerial tour or a one-time lesson so Dad can decide if he’d like to pursue those flight wings, you can purchase a gift certificate for dad to use anytime.

Just contact me, Eusebio Valdes from Miami Fly Inc at (305) 255-5519.

Click here for a testimonial from a female client who recommends this for any father!

Read our welcome blog to learn more about Miami Fly.

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